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3 signs you are on the wrong path at work

A number of years ago I pursued a job that I really wanted – primarily because I viewed it as great career move. It was an opportunity to get noticed, and to help me “climb the ladder.” I also wanted to be considered an authority in the technology we were exploring. Once I was in the position, however, I realized that maybe I was in a bit over my head; I really wasn’t prepared. I was dealing with people who intimidated me, I was being blamed for things that weren’t my fault, I was becoming very stressed and defensive, and I didn’t like the person I was turning into. Then, one day in a meeting, I was presenting a solution to a problem when my manager asked me how passionate I felt about this solution. At that moment, it was like someone flipped a light switch on. I wasn’t passionate! I wasn’t doing this because it was something I believed in. I was just trying to get ahead in my career. I suddenly realized that perhaps I was focused on the wrong things. I decided that I needed to retreat and regroup from a career standpoint. I needed to let go of my ego, let someone else who may be better qualified take over, and seek out a position in which I could better utilize my skills to serve the organization and the people around me.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states that we are invited to purify our hearts of bad instincts and seek the love of God above all else. (1723)

3 signs you are on the wrong path at work:

1  Do you focusing primarily on getting more money and more power?

2  Do you do something at work just to get recognized and honored?.

3  Do you idolize or trust more in the science, technology or art in which you work rather than the love of God.  

Here’s how to get on the right path: We must remember that happiness and contentment in our work do not come from money, position, fame or technology. Rather, “God alone is the source of every good and of all love.” (CCC 1723) Living this belief is a tall order, however, because each of the bad instincts noted above are typically considered desirable traits in a competitive workplace. Therefore, it’s tough to let go of them in lieu of God’s wisdom, which asserts that if you focus first on extending His kingdom in the workplace – for example, in serving one another – He will take care of the rest of your needs. We know this because Jesus tells us: “Instead, seek His kingdom, and these other things will be given you besides.” (Luke 12:31) If we earnestly undertake this challenge, we – and others – will begin to see the light of God in our work.